Archive for June, 2010

Soulwax and Silver Columns at Ibiza Rocks last night

June 30th, 2010

Soulwax and Silver Columns at Ibiza Rocks last night. After Es Paradis introduced no smoking in the main part – this week Ibiza Rocks Hotel have introduced no smoking in the lobby area – so we decamped to the Electric Bar to watch the Spain game inbetween the two bands – nice timing that Soulwax came on just after Spain – Portugal finished.

Set lists:
Silver Columns:
Yes and Dance
Warm Welcome
Always On
Cavalier
Columns
Brow Beaten

Soulwax:
E-Talking
Miserable Girl
Much Against
NY Excuse
Conversation
Any Minute Now
Compute
Slow Dance
Another Excuse
Saturday

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Soulwax, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Soulwax, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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The Courteeners at Ibiza Rocks 2010 last night

June 23rd, 2010

The Courteeners at Ibiza Rocks last night. Afterwards we popped down to Es Paradis for the after party with top bloke Jon McClure and his Reverend Sound System – we left when they shut the music off in the top bar at some point this morning – hence the lateness of the photos…

Set list:
Acrylic
Cavorting
Good times
Will it be this way forever?
Please don’t
Sycophant
Bide your time
The Opener
Cross my heart and hope to fly
Scratch your name
Fallowfield Hillbilly
Take over the world
You overdid it doll
Not nineteen
What took you so long?

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The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010

The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010

The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010

The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Courteeners, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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The Goldhawks & Toddla T at Ibiza Rocks last night

June 23rd, 2010

Great opening set by The Goldhawks at Ibiza Rocks last night with Toddla T in the break
Set list:
1996
Secrets
Running away
Keep the fire
Higher ground
Trick of light
Where is the world
Every time I see you cry

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The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010
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The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010
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The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010
The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010 The Goldhawks, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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Pure Form, Ibiza – A new Jewellery collective

June 21st, 2010

A new creative collective has been born in Ibiza. . .

pure form ibizaA group of five women jewellers have come together out of a shared creative sensibility and a complimentary artistic vision. Look out for them all over the island this summer with their Pop-Up Boutique.

The jewellery is all hand made on the island where, set against the backdrop of Ibiza, inspiration flourishes. The pure forms and colours of nature giving rise to a collection of beautiful, wearable jewellery. Fine craftsmanship is employed in the making of each piece, using materials which include shimmering golds & brightly hued gems, forged hand beaten silver and sparkling diamonds.

With a choice of five jewellers work there is a wide range to view, with something for everyone, from the ultra dainty to the mega statement piece. Prices range from 60 to 6,000 Euros and beyond. This is a unique opportunity to own a piece of jewellery as a keepsake from this magical island.

pure form ibizaThe designers of PURE FORM – Natasha Collis, Shakti Ellenwood, Kerstin Howard, JOY jewellery and Sia Taylor – sell in exclusive stores such as Browns and Dover Street market. Their client list includes Sadie Frost, Chrissie Hynde, Kate Moss, Jack Nicholson, Alexandra Shulman, Marissa Tomei and Ruby Wax.

PURE FORM will begin the summer with a show at Atzaró on July 1st and continue through with El Chiringuito, Natasha Collis shop and El Hotel, each one showcasing different ‘Guest Jewellers’. For a more intimate setting they will come to your villa or hotel with their Pop-up Boutique where you can peruse the jewels at your leisure with a glass of champagne and canapé in hand.
At each event PURE FORM will donate 10% of their profits to a different charity in Ibiza.

pure form ibiza



natasha collisNATASHA COLLIS
www.natashacollis.com

Natasha’s strong personal signature style encompasses irregular gold nuggets that are inspired by the reflection of the sunlight as it dances and sparkles on the Mediterranean waters of the Balearic coast. Each item of jewellery is a masterpiece in itself and possesses its own character. Wearing more than one piece layered together creates an even more striking and prominent effect.

Her shop and studio is located in St Miguel, Ibiza showcasing her entire collection and is open throughout the year. Recent celebrity buyers include Jack Nicholson, Sarah Jessica Parker, Wendy Murdock, Cindy Sherman and Nicola Fornby.



shakti ellenwoodSHAKTI ELLENWOOD
www.shaktiellenwood.com

“to wear my jewellery, in the fast speed of our daily lives, is to add something comforting; not only to the body, but also to the heart. “

Each piece is created lovingly and crafted by hand using the earth’s most precious riches; high carat gold and colourful gemstones. Shakti’s inspiration comes from many years living in the Far East, the natural beauty of Ibiza, ancient civilizations and colour in nature.

She trained at the Revere Academy of Jewellery Arts in San Francisco and apprenticed under Hratch Nargizian, a fifth generation Master Goldsmith. Her work is worn by Chrissie Hynde, Kate Moss, Sadie Frost, Ruby Wax, Marlon Richards and Marissa Tomei.


KERSTIN HOWARDKERSTIN HOWARD
www.kerstinibiza.com

Kerstin works in all carats and colours of Gold and in Sterling Silver. She mixes the metals together to create bold, striking and innovative pieces. Her specialist techniques include forging, reticulation, fusing, riveting and repoussé. All her works are satin finished to create a natural organic effect. Whilst most are kept simple and unadorned, some are more elaborate and set with precious & semi-precious stones.

Kerstin has been designing and making jewellery for over 25 years. Her work is exhibited in a number of galleries throughout the UK and has been showcased in numerous Craft Fairs.

She was brought up in Ibiza in the early 60’s and returned to live on the island in 2005. The inspirations for her latest works stem from the ebb and flow of the sea and the patterns inscribed on the sandy beaches, rock outcrops and dunes, together with the gnarled forms of the ancient olive and indigenous pine trees.


CydJOY… jewellery by Cyd
www.joy-jewels.com

Cyds jewellery is always inspiring, always unique and always a touch extravagant.

Creating luxurious yet practical jewellery for all occasions, her work is sophisticated and seductive, with an inherent beauty that has style and often spiritual meaning. Each piece tells a story of a life collecting curiosities the world over.

Superbly handcrafted in gold and silver, the collections develop each year exploring new techniques and materials. Inspiration for designs come from the outstanding natural beauty of Ibiza, where Cyd spends much of her time. A committed ecologist Cyd proudly supports fair trade initiatives, offering her clients a conscious choice and welcomes commissions using ‘green gold’ and ethically mined gems. Her tailored bespoke service has led her to specialize in unusual wedding rings.

With a long history of Silversmiths in the family Cyd preserves this lineage to create wondrous treasures with a timeless classic modern style.


SIA TAYLORSIA TAYLOR
www.siataylor.com

Sia Taylor creates her jewellery from tiny handmade elements and with a restrained minimal aesthetic. She makes unique delicate pieces in combinations of yellow and white gold which are suggestive of clusters of insect eggs, seeds or grasses.

A graduate of the Royal College of Art sculpture school, Sia continues in her jewellery collections to explore the organic forms, structures and irregular patterns of the natural world.

Sia’s discreet, beautiful pieces are stocked in exclusive stores worldwide, including Dover Street Market in London.

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Ian Brown at Ibiza Rocks – the photos

June 16th, 2010

Another blinding night at Ibiza Rocks. Detroit Social Club reminded us of an early heavy guitar “Verve” – no problem with that. Ian Brown took to the stage and started with “I wanna Be Adored” – we were in the pit taking photos and it was hard to not put the camera down and just enjoy it. Absolutely blinding gig – Ian ended on F.E.A.R, then introduced the next song as “All Our Yesterdays” – to basically a confused crowd – when instead, the opening drums of Fools Gold start and everyone goes mental. He then finished with Stellify. Afterwards we hung around for the aftershow bar then made our way down to the Es Paradis after party – that was great fun – a proper indie “disco” in gorgeous surrondings.

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Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010
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Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Ian Brown, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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13th Ibiza DJ Awards 2010

June 15th, 2010

Catch the world’s best-known DJs at the 13th edition of the DJ Awards at Pacha Ibiza on Tuesday, 28 September 2010. The biggest names from across the genres of dance music will gather to celebrate the biggest tunes, best parties and the technology that has made an unforgettable season.

dj awardsThe winners in each genre are elected through a public vote and the honourees who lift the legendary “Kryptonite” trophy have the satisfaction of knowing it is a tribute from their fans. Voting will open on the 12th of July 2010 and runs until the 16th August 2010 at www.thedjawards.wordpress.com The DJ Awards has become an end of season tradition in Ibiza. The awards unite DJs who come to celebrate the music they love. Previous winners who’ve graced the Pacha stage include Erick Morillo, Sven Vath, Tiësto, Paul Oakenfold, Luciano, Ricardo Villalobos Danny Tenaglia, Ferry Corsten, Carl Cox and Christian Varela.

The awards ceremony will include special guest performances and the party will continue till closing with Louie Vega and friends.

Every year the DJ Awards has a theme. This year’s is Water – we hope that the focus will help to prevent the imminent water-shortages around the world.

The Water theme is reflected in the artwork of the 13th Edition DJ Awards CD compilation featuring the top tunes of the 2010 season in their original, unmixed DJ-friendly versions.

House
Axwell
Bob Sinclar
David Guetta
Erick Morillo
Laidback Luke
Roger Sanchez
Sebastian Ingrosso
Steve Angello

Techno
Carl Cox
Cristian Varela
Jeff Mills
Marco V
Ricardo Villalobos
Richie Hawtin
Sven Vath
Umek

Trance
Above & Beyond
Armin Van Buuren
ATB
Ferry Corsten
Gareth Emery
Markus Schulz
Paul Van Dyk
Tiesto

Progressive House
D-Nox & Beckers
Hernan Cattaneo
John Dahlback
John Digweed
Lee Burridge
Nick Warren
Sander Kleinenberg
Sasha

Electro House
Benny Benassi
Deadmau5
Eric Prydz
Fedde Le Grand
James Zabiela
Mark Knight
Sander Van Doorn
Sebastien Leger

Tech House
Dubfire
Joris Voorn
Layo & Bushwacka
Luciano
M.A.N.D.Y.
Paul Woolford
Radio Slave
Steve Lawler

Minimal
Adam Beyer
Guy Gerber
Loco Dice
Magda
Matthias Tanzmann
Michael Mayer
Minilogue
Steve Bug

Deep House
Ben Watt
Charles Webster
Francois Kevorkian
Jimpster
Kevin Yost
Milton Jackson
Nick Curly
Phonique

Breakthrough
Dixon
Gui Boratto
Kaskade
Marcel Dettmann
Raresh
Riva Starr
Seth Troxler
Zip

Best Newcomer
Alan Fitzpatrick
Anderson Noise
Ekkohaus
Paul Kalkbrenner
Reboot
Stimming
Tim Green
Wolfgang Gartner

International DJ
Armin Van Buuren
Carl Cox
David Guetta
Deadmau5
Erick Morillo
Richie Hawtin
Sven Väth
Tiesto

Downtempo & Eclectic
DJ Ravin
Gilles Peterson
Jazzanova
Jose Padilla
Mixmaster Morris
Nightmares on Wax
Rob da Bank
Thievery Corporation

Psychedelic Trance
Ace Ventura
Astrix
GMS
Infected Mushroom
Liquid Soul
Perfect Stranger
Skazi
Yahel

Awards To Be Announced)
Dance Nation of the Year
Outstanding Dedication
Outstanding Achievement
Lifetime Achievement
International Festival
Media

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Tommie Sunshine interview at the Ibiza International Music Summit 2010

June 14th, 2010

Amongst all the Americans here this week, our two favourite characters are probably Jason Bentley and Tommie Sunshine. Bentley hosts Morning Becomes Eclectic on California’s KCRW (acknowledged as the best dance music programme in the US), and was the music superviser on the Matrix films. He’s also recently finished working with Daft Punk on the soundtrack to Tron: Legacy. Pete Tong engaged him in a fascinating discussion about working with the duo. Later Bentley moderated a panel discussion of the recent and long overdue surge of interest in dance music in the US. One of his panelists was the super cool Tommie Sunshine. Afterwards in the press room he filled us in about what’s happening in New York, the importance of authenticity and his love for the Australian party scene.

First off, let me say this. Ibiza is absolutely the heart and soul of dance music. It’s clear this island lives and breathes electronic music.

I started in ’86 and I’ve been making music for a decade now. The first big thing that I worked on was I co write Silver Screen with Felix da Housecat which went on to be quite a seminal track, and from that started getting into my own production. I’ve done well over 100 remixes in my career and I have a new single that’s just now breaking in Australia on Nova which is one of the biggest national stations.

Here’s what I love about New York. When I get home on Sunday I’m going to David Mancuso’s loft party which he’s been doing since the early 70s. He does something that’s completely out of this world in that he doesn’t mix. He puts on a record and plays it all the way to the end, and everybody claps, and he puts on another record. He plays records in their entirety and pretty much mainly plays disco, real proper ten minute long crazy disco from the ’70s. But then he’ll play a DFA remix of M.I.A. It’s from 4.30 in the afternoon to midnight, and he’s got little kids running around as well as people in their 70s. Then there’s the deep and dingy warehouse parties in Brooklyn. So there’s all of this going on at the same time and it’s all connected. It’s a pretty legitimate history in New York. There is a community there, but it’s not as big as you would hope, or as big as the mythology would lead you to believe. As I said in the panel, NY and the way it’s perceived is a myth. People think it’s this amazing place for dance music and it’s not. I mean you can go see the DFA guys throw a party and there’ll be only 200 people there. Derrick Carter can’t get 50 people in a room in Chicago!

We’re living in a very tricky time. I think one of the biggest problems in America right now is that you’ve got an entire cast of characters, especially on the major labels, who are old and probably do too much cocaine, and they’re trying to make decisions about music that’s completely divorced from all of that attitude. How can you have progress when these are the people pulling the strings. And these are the guys who fucked the whole business up in the first place. We still haven’t even progressed to figuring out how the industry got ruined in the first place, and now they’re doing it exactly the same way and only just now plugging dance music into the equation. But you know the biggest problem I think in America is that the radio doesn’t support this music. You can count on one hand I think the commercial radio stations in America that are dance music stations. One of the only real radio stations is Jason Bentley’s, because otherwise it’s all Clear Channel and controlled by inane corporate shit. When 9/11 happened they sent out a list of songs you couldn’t play any more. You couldn’t play Burnin’ Down The House, Edwin Starr’s War…all these songs came off the playlist because of what was going on.

The most perplexing part of all this I think is that in America things are the most fucking insane that they’ve ever been. We have a better president now, but nothing is fixed. We’re still in a really bad place. You would think now would be the time we’d have PE or Rage Against The Machine, all the people that were pissed, but you know what, no artist is gonna be PE because you won’t get your video or airplay tour support. You won’t play in any of the venues that Clear Channel own because they run the radio. The most dangerous person that we have is M.I.A and what is that? That’s a fucking dog and pony show, it’s like a political handjob that’s not real. It’s insincere and that is exactly what I was talking about earlier. This authenticity thing really bothers me. It’s my achilles heel. It’s “business music”, and here’s my motto: Music business, not business music.

What I find so fascinating is at no other point in history could you learn as much as you can learn about this music. You can go online and in an afternoon teach yourself the entire timeline to this music. You can learn about Kraftwerk, Giorgio Moroder… every single person that mattered in the grand scheme of things and no one’s doing it because they’re too distracted by Facebook and all this other nonsense. They have everybody totally distracted with this shit. The thing that’s really kind of a bummer is I feel like a lot of this stuff is being lost in time, and they would like you to believe that it’s always been this way, like everyone’s always had a computer. Like it’s never been any different. When I came into this we would go to the absolute worst side of Chicago, like where no sane person would ever go, right into the south side of Chicago. As a white kid from the suburbs you would never go there, but we would. Without a cellphone, without real directions. We didn’t Mapquest how to get there, we just figured it. It was dangerous and crazy, and people got their cars stolen at parties and it all was part of it, the element of danger which I feel has been completely removed. Because there is something about having to search these things down and go into situations that maybe weren’t comfortable that actually push you into having a bit more of a comprehensive experience at the end of the day.

Here’s an example of how slowly things are taking off here compared to Europe. I stood in a room and I have never seen anything like this. It was at Terminal Five in New York, two and a half thousand people, Ed Banger’s 7th anniversary and FEADZ was on the decks playing an absolutely perfect sound. There were 25 hundred kids with their feet firmly planted on the ground staring at him as if he was playing a piano. There wasn’t one person dancing, not one. I mean I’m not gonna lie. At the Guetta show at Pacha in New York there were definitely more people taking pictures with their phones than dancing, but at least everyone there was excited. I was just happy because there was a general excitement in the air at that show. Most people in modern times have such poor social skills because of how little human interaction they have on a daily basis. When they go to a nightclub they don’t even know how to act. They don’t even know that it’s ok to dance, like they’re not comfortable enough with themselves to get on a dance floor and act the fool, because they’re too worried about who’s watching, and how it’s going to look on Facebook the next day.

Understand something. In 1986 when I started going out there was no danger of having your photograph taken in a nightclub, and if anybody did take out a camera somebody would rugby tackle them. The minute that you involve a camera everyone changes how they act and the authenticity of the moment goes right down the shitter. I’m hoping the underground will recultivate this authenticity. I hope that there’s a bunch of kids that are throwing parties and booking DJs that I’ve never heard of, playing a genre of music I don’t know about and what’s going on in the underground for teenage kids shouldn’t have anything to do with me anyway.

The craziest place in the world I think for dance music right now is Australia. Absolutely. When you go out in that country it’s as if everyone in the room just got a text message that said that the world is ending in five minutes and that if they don’t fucking party as hard as they can its gonna end sooner. I just got back from Creamfields there where I played right before the Bloody Beetroots who were headlining to ten thousand people and it was one of the craziest things I’ve ever seen. The thing about Australia is that you can play anything, as long as you’re playing music from an authentic place and it comes from the heart they will react accordingly. I did an interview for my new single on Nova and the Action Battle Team as they’re called, – the presenters are 19, 20 and 21 years old, so it’s coming totally from a youth perspective. It was hysterical. One of the things they made me do and this just goes to show you the perspective, was a station ID in which I insult them and they record it. So I abused them verbally and they play it on the radio all the time. When you put power into kids’ hands and you let them decide what they’re gonna play and they take the reigns – that’s when things get interesting.

But back to the inauthenticity thing in corporate business music. When it gets like that it gets dirty to me. I feel lke itchy when I hear music like that as it seems totally contrived. It is being made to make money and if you’re going to do that, then do it the KLF way and have your little finger up. I’m all about that. Every single person in the music biz needs to read KLF’s The Manual. To make them more real about the whole thing. It’s all in there and that’s the baby that really tells it like it is….

Interview by Helen Donlon
Pix by Frank Fabian.

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Ibiza weekly round up in photos

June 12th, 2010

We’ve teamed up with our good friends at Gala Ibiza to put up photos of all the openings they attend. This week was the opening of the new News Cafe in Marina Botafoch in Ibiza Town, the opening of the terrace bar at the 5 star Aguas de Ibiza hotel and audition night for La Troya:

News Cafe:


Aguas de Ibiza:

La Troya auditions:


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Interview with Mark Ronson at IMS Ibiza 2010

June 10th, 2010

The Third Ibiza International Music Summit (IMS) came round as ever to coincide with the first big summer opening parties in the beach bars and clubs. The respectably later starts to each day’s panels were really most welcome given the heat and the palpably more laid back and confident vibe of this year’s event. Once again, the Gran Hotel in the marina was the mothership for the daytime events, with evening sessions at Grial and Pacha, and the grand finale event on full moon up in Dalt Vila.

For me the act that will feel the most pressure is the one who carries the week’s finale gig through sunset and into the rising full moon night and weekend, effectively warming up the medieval ramparts for the summer season. This year the job went to Mark Ronson who, just before heading up to Dalt Vila to face his music, was increasingly feeling the heat. We managed to grab a few minutes alone with Mark after his keynote interview with Pete Tong. Mark was somewhat panicky so we tried to reassure him all would be ok. After all , we told him, he would be playing not only to relaxing IMS delegates but also to quite a lot of local music lovers, many of whom would be coming up specifically to see him. Whoops… Head in hands, his trademark frown appeared. He seemed like a rabbit in the headlights. It was sweet. He was taking his role really seriously.

You just keep heaping on these fucking expectations. Everyone keeps saying ‘are you ready for Dalt Vila?’ and I’m like ‘Fuck!! I don’t know…it is a really big deal to play there, and its such a brilliant location and especially as the sun’s going down.

It is a brilliant location. I point out that it’s probably the perfect place to play a whole new set, because here the crowd will know the difference; and because it’s sunset *and* full moon it will all be really intense up there in the ancient fortress. The words ‘full moon’ though set him off again.

Why do you keep saying these things?  I feel like I’m going in-fucking-SANE. To be totally honest when my last record Version came out I had a set that I knew would always kill it, but because the new record’s only just finished I haven’t quite worked out that set, and I don’t want to play the Version set because that’s stale now. I think I’ll just improvise and hopefully it’ll be ok. I just didn’t realise it was such a big deal, this gig.  That’s amazing though.  It’s really nice to play to a familiar sort of crowd, but it is also about turning other people on. You know, the English people here they know me, so there’s a comfort level there. They can come hear me having probably heard me play before, and it’s exciting to play for the kids too, and for people that are going to maybe hear your thing for the first time and, hopefully, like it.

He’s been here before. Indeed he headlined at Ibiza Rocks a couple of years back. He has his own style, reflected in his excellent sartorials, his warm and endearing relationship to everything he touches on and his music tastes, which say total street dude one minute, and great big softie the next. Now he’s weighing up where to set the dial for tonight’s crowd.

Each crowd in each place is like its own little enclave, that’s the thing. I’ve played Pacha on a Friday night where its super-Euro, like Italians coming in to hear your music and trying to figure it out. Then you can play in Eden or something in San Antonio, where it’s like playing Manchester, and that’s nice too. This is the mecca of dance music. People really come here to have a great time unless you really fuck that up for them.

One of the things Ronson has said in his audience interview with Pete Tong earlier that had caught my interest was how much he loved Duran Duran. So much so that in 2008 he re-worked the band’s catalogue with them, live at La Cigale in Paris at a one-off gig. I asked him where this had come from?

From when I was a kid. I can’t remember what the first Duran Duran track I discovered was but I definitely remember loving The Union of the Snake, and Seven and the Ragged Tiger. That was one of the first CDs that I ever owned in fact. Then The Reflex. When I was nine, with the very first band that I was ever in at school, we played at the school talent show. We played Wild Boys and it was a fucking catastrophe. We only rehearsed once. We just thought it’d be cool, ‘oh we’ll just plug in electric guitars and perform, and it doesn’t matter’.  We got the biggest screaming at from our teacher, she said ‘you were an insult to everybody!’ But the Duran thing is kind of amazing. To be able to get to a situation where you’re making a band sound like music that you loved when you were a kid, to get them to revisit and reclaim what they did so well.
Ronson’s production credits include Amy Winehouse’s Back To Black, Ghostface Killah’s More Fish, Kaiser Chief’s Off With Their Heads, Lily Allen’s Alright, Still, Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s Osirus and Robbie Williams’ Rudebox.  So I’m sure a few producers feature in his hero list.

Well yeah, and today I’m way more knowledgable because you get to study all the records and you get behind the people that you love. I definitely looked up to Phil Spector, but I really really loved Rick Rubin back then, because when you’re a kid and looking at someone that iconic…I mean he could be in a children’s book, like Where’s Waldo because he’s just so interesting.  I loved the Beastie Boys, The Black Crowes, Slayer. LL Cool J. And then I loved hiphop, Dre and DJ Premier who was definitely my favourite producer. Pete Rock. I mean they’re all amazing.

I had my own studio for a little while too, but I was on the road so much it just didn’t make sense me paying like crazy New York rent so I gave it up. The studio where I recorded my new album is a friend’s place in Williamsburg in Brooklyn. We kind of just set up shop there for six months. It was the first time I worked there but it did become my favourite because it’s got an amazing vibe. He just made it himself and you can tell it was made with love. It was like somewhere that The Band might have recorded at in 1972.  It actually looked to me like old footage of The Band in Woodstock, it’s got that kind of vibe to it.  I mix in London with an engineer called Tom Elmhirst. Someone recommended him for the Amy Winehouse record and since then I pretty much go to him.

Calmer now, I think, I ask him what he would do if it were the end of the world. He’s going to go one of two ways – the craziest party ever, with him performing at his favourite world nightspot or…He opts for the ‘or’ scenario.

Easy. I’d wanna be with my girlfriend. I don’t even know if I’d want to perform. I’d just feel like staying in and snuggling for the last 12 hours or whatever. Probably watch Arrested Development or Curb Your Enthusiasm and try and get my mind off the fact the world’s going to end…

Two hours later, after he’s been spotted backstage up in Dalt Vila by our cameraman intensely finishing off his set preparation, he delivers a magnificently eclectic and heartfelt set to the appreciative lunar congregation and by the end he is having a thoroughly good time.  “Thank you so much! This has been totally fucking awesome!” he tells the crowd, and closes out with a new track featuring Boy George before he lets Sasha take over for the late set.

by Helen Donlon and Frank Fabian

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Ibiza Rocks opening gig with Biffy Clyro tonight

June 9th, 2010

If tonights Ibiza Rocks opening party with Biffy Clyro and Bombay Bicycle Club is anything to go by then weve got a feast of summer gigs to look forward to. I’ll leave the review to my colleague but suffice to say Biffy were bluddy brilliant – to cap it off as soon as they finished they exited stage left which no-one had done before, almost as if they were going into the crowd, they then jumped over the barriers blocking the pool and proceeded to jump in and swim the length of the pool before getting out at the far end – before anyone (security) knew what was happening.

Set list:
That Golden Rule
Living Is A Problem Because Everything Dies
Glitter and Trauma
Bubbles
9/15ths
Shock, Shock
Whos Got A Match ?
Justboy
Mountains
Born On A Horse
Saturday Superhouse
A Whole Child Ago
Many Of Horror
The Captain

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Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010
Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010 Biffy Clyro, Ibiza Rocks 2010

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